Supercars impounded in Chennai

Supercars impounded in Chennai

On 26 February 2017, Sunday, ten imported cars - including a Ferrari, two Lamborghinis, a Mercedes and an Audi - standing in a row outside the Kanathur police station in outer fringes of the city. The owners (aged 30 or below), refused to show papers. 

How can the speed racing problem be solved?

On 26 February 2017, Sunday, ten imported cars - including a Ferrari, two Lamborghinis, a Mercedes and an Audi - standing in a row outside the Kanathur police station in outer fringes of the city. The owners (aged 30 or below), refused to show papers. They didn't cooperate with police who were acting on complaints from the local residents.

Taken together, the price of the cars is likely to cross Rs 30 crore. Among them was a Mercedes Benz AMG GT costing around Rs 4 crore, a Lamborghini Huracan available at Rs 4 crore and a Lamborghini Aventador, sold in India for nearly Rs 5 crore. The cars were seen speeding outside the city, on the East Coast Road towards Mahabalipuram, around 6 am.

What is the issue?

In all probability, they were taking part in an early-morning race. Such races are not unusual on that road. The police are yet to give out any information about the owners, those behind wheels or whether any cases have been filed.  Last year in September, an auto-rickshaw driver died and six others were injured when a speeding Porsche allegedly hit them in Chennai. The 'problem' started when one of the men, identified as Raghav Krishnan who was driving a Lamborghini, was arrested by police after they claimed that his car had run over the foot of a police inspector. Police booked Krishnan for rash and negligent driving, and criminal intimidation.

Why are Youngsters Doing it?

Chennai has at least 8 to 10 illegal street racing groups with in the Triplicane-Royapettah area alone, having 4 or 5 unnotified race tracks. Most of these car clubs are loose groups started by youngsters and do not have registration or affiliation with motoring organisations anywhere in the world. So, they set the rules and the limits that govern their speed. These car clubs are for pure pleasure as cruising through the city late at late night. No traffic takes the week-long work-pressure out of their mind, claim the youngsters. This is a passion mainly for college students who want to attract people on the roads.

Assessment

Speed racing is a sport and as a youthful nation, we should encourage the sport. However, in the absence of notified race tracks, safety of pedestrians and drivers is jeopardised. Perhaps, the government should give licences to private parties to develop race tracks so that the sport is encouraged without danger to pedestrians.

 

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